A former top advisor to former US president Bill Clinton says there’s a ‘good chance’ Hillary Clinton will run against Donald Trump in the 2024 presidential election if the current administration led by Joe Biden loses Congress in the 2022 midterms.

Dick Morris claimed Sunday morning, January 16 that a Clinton-Trump rematch is likely if the Democrats don’t win congress in the November 2022 election, alleging the failure would cause the party to turn on President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris and support a candidate like Hilary Clinton.

 

‘There’s a good chance of it,’ Morris told WABC radio host John Catsimatidis before applauding Hilton’s campaign strategy, which could see her face-off against Donald Trump again after Trump beat her to the White House in 2016. 

‘Hillary has set up a brilliant, brilliant strategy that nobody else is able to do.’

 ‘What she’s done — at a point at which no Democrat is willing to come out and criticize Joe Biden, but all Democrats are disappointed with him and have to realize the ultimate correctness of our accusations that he was incompetent to be president — she has set up a zero-sum gain with him. 

‘The worse he does, the better she does because she’s positioned herself as the Democratic alternative to Biden.’

Although Clinton has not yet said if she intends to enter the bid for president in 2024, she has publicly taken aim at the current administration’s efforts, saying they ‘mean nothing if we don’t have a Congress that will get things done and we don’t have a White House that we can count on to be sane and sober and stable and productive’.

 

Morris also claimed Clinton, 74, has portrayed herself as the opposition to the extreme left and cautioned her own party to be careful if candidates they bring up in what she refers to as ‘purple districts’. 

 

The former political advisor alleged ‘there is only one person capable of that level of thinking — and that’s her husband, Bill.’

 

Morris alleged Clinton is well positioned to be the Democratic party’s change candidate who can reference Biden’s failures, noting that a ‘left-wing took over the party and led us into disaster in the 2022 midterms’.

‘The person who staked out the turf first and owns the turf in the Democratic Party is going to be Hillary. It’s a brilliant, brilliant strategy?,’ he explained. 

Hilary Clinton told NBC’s Willie Geist last month that Democrats needed candidates who could win in purple states if it was to have a Congress that will ‘get things done.’

 

‘I think that it is a time for some careful thinking about what wins elections, and not just in deep blue districts where a democrat and a liberal Democrat or so-called progressive Democrat is going to win,’ said Clinton.  

‘We’ve got to be very clear eyed about what it’s going to take to hold the House and the Senate in 2022. And to win the electoral college because also Republicans are doing everything they can to create an environment in which winning the Electoral College, even narrowly the way Joe Biden did will be out of reach for Democrats,’ she argued in December, just weeks after the party’s defeat in Virginia’s gubernatorial election.

‘But at the end of the day, nothing is going to get done if you don’t have a Democratic majority in the House, in the Senate, and our majority comes from people who win in much more difficult districts and our majority in the Senate comes from people who can win in not just blue states and hold those wins … but can win in more purpleish states,’ she said. 

‘So this is going to be a very intense period, not just for the Democratic Party, but for the country.’ 

 

Morris, referencing her commentary, added: ‘She was absolutely right and nobody else has the guts to say that.’

‘Hillary can say “go to hell, I don’t care about you guys. I’m going to be the anti-Chirst, I’m going to run against you.” Therefore, she’s the only one between now and the end of the midterm elections who’s prepared to say what the truth is,’ Morris said.

He added: ‘She staked out a ground, not on ideological issues, but on pragmatism.’